Ethiopia - Judicial system



The government of Ethiopia is now putting into place a decentralized federal system of courts consisting of regional and district courts consistent with the 1994 constitution. Each region has District (Woreda), higher and supreme courts. There are also local Shari'ah courts which hear religion and family cases involving Muslims. The Federal High Court and Federal Supreme Court have jurisdiction over cases involving federal laws, transregional issues, and issues of national import. The president and vice president of the Federal Supreme Court are recommended by the prime minister and appointed by the House of People's Representatives; for other federal judges, the prime minister submits to the House of People's Representatives for appointment candidates selected by the Federal Judicial Administrative Council.

The constitution provides for an independent judiciary. Trials are public. Defendants have a right to legal counsel and a public defender's office provides counsel to indigent defendants. The law, however, does not allow the defense access to prosecutorial evidence before the trial, and the current judiciary suffers from a lack of trained personnel and financial constraints. In 1995, the government began training new judges and prosecutors. However, it is estimated that the creation of a fully independent and skilled judicial system will take several decades.

In 1992, a special prosecutor's office was established. In 1994 this office began trying defendants charged with crimes against humanity during the Mengistu regime. As of 1997, approximately 1,300 detainees were charged with war crimes. Up to 5,198 persons had been charged with war crimes by the end of 1999.

The Council of People's Representatives in October 1999 passed enabling legislation to meet the constitutional requirement for the creation of a human rights commission and office of the ombudsman. The commission has full powers to receive and investigate all complaints of human rights violations made against any person. By the end of 1999, neither entity was operational.

User Contributions:

hassen
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Jan 1, 2008 @ 2:14 pm
A GOOOD PAPER IS PREPARED BY THE WRITER ABOUT ETHIOPIAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM .NOW I M REDING IT AND FIND IT VERY AMAZING
Lynette
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Feb 7, 2009 @ 8:08 am
VERY INFORMATIVE. I REFER TO IT ALL THE TIME WHENEVER IAM DEALING WITH ISSUES TOUCHING ON THE JUDICIAL SYSTEM OF ETHIOPIA.
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Aug 25, 2010 @ 5:05 am
the information given here is very important one.But it's too short.
the question that I want to ask is the extent of judicial independency regarding to financial,using power freely etc.
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Apr 15, 2011 @ 1:13 pm
do you have any thing more about independence of judiciary in relation to Ethiopian federal court structure?
mesfin
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Jun 11, 2012 @ 11:23 pm
The information provided her is so good,however it is very short.about Ethiopian juridical system,it give brief information,so try to add other information ,about this topic. thank-you !!
kado wayu
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Aug 24, 2012 @ 1:13 pm
IT GOOD TO KNOW THE ETHIOPIAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM AS IT IS THE CURRENT ISSUE OF RESEARCH
ABREHAM MULATIE
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Nov 15, 2012 @ 5:05 am
IT IS GOOD BUT SHORT PLEASE ADD OR WRIGHT ABOUT THE ROLE OF COURTS FOR ETHIOPIAN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
kedir dedesso
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Nov 26, 2012 @ 5:05 am
it is good ffor ethiopia to have independent jjuditiaal organ.but what is the rational behind that the p.minister recommendation to appont president and v.president/

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