Burundi - Tourism, travel, and recreation





The tourism industry is still in its infancy, but there is ample opportunity for development. Lake Tanganyika is internationally famous for its scenic beauty. Points of interest include Bujumbura, the capital, on Lake Tanganyika; Gitega, the former capital, with its museum and traditional handicraft center; and the Mosso area in the southeast, with its fairly abundant wildlife. The northeast has a great variety of tropical birds. Burundi is rich in folk art; the dances and drummers of the Tutsi are particularly well known. In recent years, tourism has declined due to interethnic warfare in the region. In 1998, 15,404 tourists visited Burundi, almost 50% from other African nations. Tourist receipts that year came to less than $1 million. There were 551 hotel rooms and 888 beds with an 18% occupancy rate in 1998.

All visitors require a valid passport and visa. A certificate of vaccination against yellow fever and cholera is also required. Costs of traveling in Burundi vary greatly, depending upon which city is visited. In 2002, the US Department of State estimated the cost of staying in Bujumbura at $147 per day.

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Jul 12, 2011 @ 3:15 pm
Looking at above statement , i totally agree with and I would repeat this phrase that seemed very true to me and most of burundians and its visitors.

The tourism industry is still in its infancy, but there is ample opportunity for development
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jul 12, 2011 @ 3:15 pm
Looking at above statement , i totally agree with and I would repeat this phrase that seemed very true to me and most of burundians and its visitors.

The tourism industry is still in its infancy, but there is ample opportunity for development

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