Fiji - Health



Fiji's health standards are relatively high. In 1986, there were 385 doctors, 67 dentists, and 1,572 nurses. Medical facilities included three main hospitals and three specialized hospitals; a total of 27 hospitals had 1,743 beds. In 1997 there were 0.5 physicians, 2 nurses, and 0.04 dentists per 1,000 people. Cardiovascular disease and cancer have become the top two causes of death in hospitals during the last few years. The increasing mortality has been attributed to hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes, once relatively unknown in the Fijian community, increased tenfold among Fijian urban dwellers between 1967 and 1980. A cancer survey conducted in 1989 showed extremely high dietary intakes of fat and cholesterol.

The fertility rate was an estimated 2.8 in 2002. The infant mortality rate was estimated at 13.7 per 1,000 live births and estimated average life expectancy was 68.5 years. The estimated overall death was 5.7 per 1,000 people and the birth rate was 23.2 per 1,000. Between 1991 and 1994, 96% of children were immunized against measles. Venereal diseases have increased in recent years and infantile diarrhea persists. In 1996, seven AIDS cases were reported. As of 2000 the number of people living with HIV/AIDS was estimated at 85.

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User Contributions:

1
Elizabeth
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Oct 12, 2011 @ 7:19 pm
I think you should include the life expectancy of the people. I am doing a report for school and i need this information. Thanks!
Liz
2
Elizabeth
Report this comment as inappropriate
Oct 12, 2011 @ 7:19 pm
I think you should include the life expectancy of the people. I am doing a report for school and i need this information. Thanks!
Liz

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