Bahrain - Environment



Bahrain's principal environmental problems are scarcity of fresh water, desertification, and pollution from oil production. Population growth and industrial development have reduced the amount of agricultural land and lowered the water table, leaving aquifers vulnerable to saline contamination. In recent years, the government has attempted to limit extraction of groundwater (in part by expansion of seawater desalinization facilities) and to protect vegetation from further erosion. In 1994, 100% of Bahrain's urban dwellers and 57% of the rural population had pure water. Bahrain has developed its oil resources at the expense of its agricultural lands. As a result, lands that might otherwise be productive are gradually claimed by the expansion of the desert. Pollution from oil production was accelerated by the Persian Gulf War and the resulting damage to oil-producing facilities in the Gulf area, which threatened the purity of both coastal and ground water, damaging coastlines, coral reefs, and marine vegetation through oil spills and other discharges.

A wildlife sanctuary established in 1980 home to threatened Gulf species, including the Arabian oryx, gazelle, zebra, giraffe, Defassa waterbuck, addax, and lesser kudu. Bahrain has also established captive breeding centers for falcons and for the rare Houbara bustard. The goitered gazelle, the greater spotted eagle, and the green sea turtle are considered endangered species.

User Contributions:

fatima
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 28, 2009 @ 11:11 am
i would like to know the latest news about the enviromnet in Bahrain and wht are the actions taken in the poistive or negtive way
Ali
Report this comment as inappropriate
Sep 15, 2010 @ 12:00 am
i agree with ''fatima'', i would like to know as well.

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA


Bahrain forum